The Winds of Barclay Street

The Amusing Life and Sad Demise of the New York World-Telegram and Sun

by John Ferris


Formats

Softcover
£11.11
Hardcover
£18.34
Softcover
£11.11

Book Details

Language : English
Publication Date : 10/25/2013

Format : Softcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 166
ISBN : 9781491822715
Format : Hardcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 166
ISBN : 9781491822708

About the Book

John Ferris wrote The Winds of Barclay Street on behalf of the men and women who worked on the New York World-Telegram and Sun. After the prestigious newspaper's demise, in 1967, he often reminisced with his former colleagues, fondly remembering the antics and tomfoolery of fellow journalists as well as their reportage of serious news. Their past seemed a wondrous experience that must be preserved before it faded completely, consigning their significant if often foolish history to oblivion. The Winds of Barclay Street recalls comical episodes of the reporters on daily assignment for news, as well as the highly-gifted staff writers and editors who enlivened their working hours by writing fictitious, amusing articles not found in straight news. The book covers the heady days of the newspaper's prime through its sad but inevitable decline and eventual demise due to economic and social conditions in New York City of the 1960s. Today the old Barclay Street is unrecognizable, as giant behemoths of architectural stone and granite cover the former location of a once-great newspaper and the small businesses of lower Manhattan. The Winds of Barclay Street recalls a lost era and the individual men and women who wrote a newspaper read by thousands of commuters on subway, bus, train, or ferry, and by subscribers at home.


About the Author

John Ferris began his writing career as a newspaperman and drama critic for the Associated Press in 1931. He covered the Bruno Haupman trial, for which he wrote nearly 250,000 words. In 1942 he joined Newsweek as a national affairs writer and later education editor. He joined the New York World- Telegram and Sun in 1951 and wrote a syndicated column that appeared in newspapers throughout the country. He was best known for his feature writing and his warmhearted, witty, seasonal weather articles. As a magazine writer, he contributed to The New Yorker, Life, Opera News, Horticulture, The Saturday Review and the travel and Book Review sections of The New York Times. He owned many books and his knowledge and understanding of James Joyce’s Ulysses were evident in his writings. His managing editor of the World-Telegram and Sun called him “a mighty man at the typewriter who savored a well-turned phrase or a deft shaft of whimsy fired at a gloomy world.” At home on Sundays he enjoyed the challenge of the New York Times crossword puzzle, often completing it in ink. He died in 1993.