Passion for Memories

by Dania Mohammed Jamjoom


Formats

Softcover
$22.99
Hardcover
$33.99
E-Book
$3.99
Softcover
$22.99

Book Details

Language : English
Publication Date : 4/7/2021

Format : Softcover
Dimensions : 8.5x8.5
Page Count : 76
ISBN : 9781665508780
Format : Hardcover
Dimensions : 8.5x8.5
Page Count : 76
ISBN : 9781665508803
Format : E-Book
Dimensions : N/A
Page Count : 76
ISBN : 9781665508797

About the Book

Here, you are invited to ride a rollercoaster of memories with me, which has two opposing poles: the lowest of lows, those of sadness, gloom, and grief, and the highest of highs, representing utmost joy, happiness, and the willingness to simply let go and have fun. In Passion for Memories, you will not only read my poems: you will read my innermost thoughts and my remarkable journeys, both beautiful and disheveled. The process of sharing my poetry has been transparent, vulnerable, and raw. Here, I speak to the world from the very depths of my heart, hoping that my words reach the very depths of your heart, too. What you have in this book is my heart, bare and tender, enclosed in your hands. Please take care of it, and most importantly, let go, be free, and enjoy the ride–– life is too short, and there’s way too much fun.


About the Author

Dania Mohammed Jamjoom is a Saudi Arabian poet based in her birthplace of Jeddah. Raised in Winnipeg, Canada, she eventually relocated back home, and graduated from her secondary studies at Al Ferdous High School in 2002 to pursue a degree in Medicine at King Abdulaziz University. During her fourth year of medical school, Dania was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, which changed the path of her journey, but did not change her true passion for writing. An avid writer since childhood, she was inspired by the poems of her grandfather, Diya’a al-Deen Rajab. Dania Jamjoom’s poetry stands witness to her remarkable journey of growth, accompanying her through her coming of age, and the subsequent highs and lows of her medical condition. To Dania, writing was not only the release she needed for her complex emotions––it was second nature, a part of her identity for as long as she could remember.