My Name is Not Chief

The Life of an American Indian

by Ben Blue & Kent Koppelman


Formats

Softcover
$16.95
Hardcover
$27.99
E-Book
$3.99
Softcover
$16.95

Book Details

Language : English
Publication Date : 12/15/2015

Format : Softcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 234
ISBN : 9781504967808
Format : Hardcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 234
ISBN : 9781504967822
Format : E-Book
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 234
ISBN : 9781504967815

About the Book

Ben Blue is born prematurely on a kitchen table in Chicago in 1956. As the tiny Ho-Chunk Indian takes his first breath, he has no idea of the challenges that await him in life. Ben grows up amid poverty in his grandparents’ Wisconsin home where he learns how to fight, face bullies, and play football. As he is shuttled between his alcoholic mother’s home and his grandparents’, Ben must cling to hope that he can one day overcome the despair that has haunted the American Indians for generations. When Ben moves to California with his mother, his life spirals downward after he is introduced to drugs and alcohol. After his mother dies, Ben journeys through the darkness of addiction and poverty—until he commits to sobriety, causing his life to take a turn for the better. Even as Ben finds a job, earns a college degree, marries, and has children, he must battle the lures of his addiction. As his path leads him to explore his Ho-Chunk identity and address stereotypical images of Indians, he proudly makes a declaration that changes everything. My Name is Not Chief shares the tale of an American Indian’s struggles as he attempts to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles and find his place in the world.


About the Author

Dr. Kent Koppelman spent nearly thirty years teaching about diversity issues at the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse. He is the author of four books on diversity, a memoir, and a book about grief. Now retired, he and his wife, Jan, live in La Crosse where they enjoy spending time with their daughter and two grandchildren. Ben Blue is a full-blood Ho-Chunk Indian who experienced poverty and addiction. Determined to rise above his hardships, he became sober and eventually earned bachelor and master’s degrees, and he currently holds a teaching position on a four-year college campus. The father of two is a passionate advocate for Ho Chunk and American Indian children.